Secondhand Smoke

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A smoke-free setting is healthiest for babies. This includes cars, homes, restaurants, stores and other public spaces.

Because babies’ lungs are still developing, exposure to smoke can make it harder for them to breathe and lead to coughing, colds and even asthma. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is also more common among babies who are exposed to secondhand smoke.

If your baby has been with someone who was smoking, it is important to change any clothes, blankets, etc. that may have picked up smoke residue. If they have touched a surface where smoke particles may have settled such as the floor, be sure to clean their hands so they don’t put those particles in their mouth. Also clean any carriers, infant seats, toys and other items that may have picked up the residue.

TO FIND PROVIDERS IN CONNECTICUT’S COMMUNITY RESOURCES DATABASE:

Search by program name: Smoking Cessation, Smoking Education/Prevention

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

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SOURCES: American Academy of Pediatrics; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
PREPARED BY: 211
CONTENT LAST REVIEWED: November 2019